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Outros/O Chapeu de Ouro de Schifferstad
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Outros/O Chapeu de Ouro de Schifferstad
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O Chapeu de Ouro de Schifferstad

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2010-08-09 22:14:16
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descrição
Cultural context

The Schifferstadt specimen was the oldest of a group of (by now) four known Golden hats, cone-shaped Bronze Age head-dresses made of sheet gold. All but one were found in Southern Germany. The Schifferstadt hat was the first to be discovered. After the example from Berlin, it is the best-preserved one, fully preserved with the exception of a small part of the brim.

Three associated bronze axes and a comparison with other Late Bronze Age metwalwork date the Schifferstadt Hat to circa 1,400-1,300 BC.

The hat, like its counterparts, is assumed to have served as a religious insignia for the deities or priests of a sun-cult common in Bronze Age Europe. The hats are also suggested to have served calendrical functions.
[edit] Description
Schifferstadt hat: Ornamental bands and respective stamped patterns

The Schifferstadt Hat is a 350 g gold cone, subdivided into horizontal ornamental bands, applied in the repoussé technique. It has a blunt, undecorated tip. The shaft is short and squat, with a distinct widening and a wide brim at the bottom. The hat is 29.6 cm high and has a lower diameter of about 18 cm. The brim is 4.5 cm wide.

At its base the gold sheet was wound around a copper wire (now lost) for extra stability.

Along its whole length the hat is subdivided and decorated by rows of horizontal symbols and bands. Five different stamps and a chisel or liner were used to create the horizontal bands of repeated stamped symbols, following a systematic scheme.

The optical separation of the individual ornamental bands was achieved by ring ribs or bands around the whole external face of the hat. The symbols in the bands are mostly disk and circle motifs, usually with an internal disk or buckle, surrounded by up to six concentric circles.

Striking are two bands with eye-like motifs, resembling similar symbols on the hats of Ezelsdorf and Berlin. Unlike the other known examples, the cone's top is not decorated with a star but left entirely unembellished.

The illustration shows the scheme of the shape and composition of the hat, as well as number of ornamental zones and of the number of stamps used for each.
[edit] Provenance and find history

The Golden Hat of Schifferstadt was discovered on the 29th of April 1835, during agricultural work in a field named Reuschlache, one km north of Schifferstadt. On the following day the find was handed to officials at Speyer, then part of the Kingdom of Bavaria.

The known circumstances suggest a cult-related deposition: The hat was buried upright, about 60 cm deep. Its top reached to just below the ground surface. When found the hat stood on a slab of back-burnt clay. It was filled with earth or an earth-ashes mixture, of which nothing remains.

The clay slab, which crumbled during its recovery and is now entirely lost, sat on a one inch layer of sand, placed in a rectangular pit. Three bronze axes were leaning against the cone

Sábado passado, dia 08.08.2010, saí da minha regiao com destino a Spayer (onde encontra-se este chapéu de ouro, em exposisao num museu), a fim de conhecer esta reliquia. Valeu a viagem de 105 kms (210 ida e volta), a fim de desfrutar, mais uma vez, da história...
exif / informação técnica
Máquina: Panasonic
Modelo: DMC-TZ3
Exposição: 10/80
Abertura: f/3.4
ISO: 200
MeteringMode: Pattern
Flash: Não
Dist.Focal: 4.9 mm

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O Chapeu de Ouro de Schifferstad
Cultural context

The Schifferstadt specimen was the oldest of a group of (by now) four known Golden hats, cone-shaped Bronze Age head-dresses made of sheet gold. All but one were found in Southern Germany. The Schifferstadt hat was the first to be discovered. After the example from Berlin, it is the best-preserved one, fully preserved with the exception of a small part of the brim.

Three associated bronze axes and a comparison with other Late Bronze Age metwalwork date the Schifferstadt Hat to circa 1,400-1,300 BC.

The hat, like its counterparts, is assumed to have served as a religious insignia for the deities or priests of a sun-cult common in Bronze Age Europe. The hats are also suggested to have served calendrical functions.
[edit] Description
Schifferstadt hat: Ornamental bands and respective stamped patterns

The Schifferstadt Hat is a 350 g gold cone, subdivided into horizontal ornamental bands, applied in the repoussé technique. It has a blunt, undecorated tip. The shaft is short and squat, with a distinct widening and a wide brim at the bottom. The hat is 29.6 cm high and has a lower diameter of about 18 cm. The brim is 4.5 cm wide.

At its base the gold sheet was wound around a copper wire (now lost) for extra stability.

Along its whole length the hat is subdivided and decorated by rows of horizontal symbols and bands. Five different stamps and a chisel or liner were used to create the horizontal bands of repeated stamped symbols, following a systematic scheme.

The optical separation of the individual ornamental bands was achieved by ring ribs or bands around the whole external face of the hat. The symbols in the bands are mostly disk and circle motifs, usually with an internal disk or buckle, surrounded by up to six concentric circles.

Striking are two bands with eye-like motifs, resembling similar symbols on the hats of Ezelsdorf and Berlin. Unlike the other known examples, the cone's top is not decorated with a star but left entirely unembellished.

The illustration shows the scheme of the shape and composition of the hat, as well as number of ornamental zones and of the number of stamps used for each.
[edit] Provenance and find history

The Golden Hat of Schifferstadt was discovered on the 29th of April 1835, during agricultural work in a field named Reuschlache, one km north of Schifferstadt. On the following day the find was handed to officials at Speyer, then part of the Kingdom of Bavaria.

The known circumstances suggest a cult-related deposition: The hat was buried upright, about 60 cm deep. Its top reached to just below the ground surface. When found the hat stood on a slab of back-burnt clay. It was filled with earth or an earth-ashes mixture, of which nothing remains.

The clay slab, which crumbled during its recovery and is now entirely lost, sat on a one inch layer of sand, placed in a rectangular pit. Three bronze axes were leaning against the cone

Sábado passado, dia 08.08.2010, saí da minha regiao com destino a Spayer (onde encontra-se este chapéu de ouro, em exposisao num museu), a fim de conhecer esta reliquia. Valeu a viagem de 105 kms (210 ida e volta), a fim de desfrutar, mais uma vez, da história...
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Máquina: Panasonic
Modelo: DMC-TZ3
Exposição: 10/80
Abertura: f/3.4
ISO: 200
MeteringMode: Pattern
Flash: Não
Dist.Focal: 4.9 mm


favorita de (1)